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2013 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: New Insights Into High-Risk Prostate Cancer; Management Of Small Kidney Tumors

Research on promising new therapies and data on the relative benefits of established treatments for were released, in advance of the fourth annual Symposium, being held February 14-16, 2013, at the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, FL.
The results of three studies were highlighted in a media presscast (press briefing via live webcast):

  • High-Risk Affects African-American Men and Older Men of Any Race: Findings from a large population-based study show men older than 75 years account for about 40 percent of all patients with high-risk, PSA-detected and have a 9.4 fold higher likelihood of having high-risk disease at diagnosis compared with men younger than 50. African Americans of any age are more likely to have high-risk disease than white men. Asymptomatic men should discuss the relative risk and benefits of PSA screening to make an informed decision.
  • Duration of Therapy Can be Cut in Half without Jeopardizing Survival: A prospective randomized clinical trial demonstrates that survival rates are the same in men with high-risk cancer who receive radiation therapy and either 18 or 36 months of androgen blockade. The finding implies that the standard course of androgen blockade, 24-36 months, could be safely shortened, potentially decreasing side effects and costs to patients and society.
  • Surveillance of Small Renal Masses Is a Safe Alternative to Surgery for : A retrospective analysis of more than 8,300 diagnosed with small masses in their kidneys shows that kidney cancer-related death rates are comparable whether a patient undergoes surveillance or surgery to remove the mass. The analysis also found that patients who underwent surveillance had a lower risk of suffering a cardiovascular complication and dying of any cause.

“Two studies presented will help guide our use of established treatment and surveillance approaches for prostate and kidney cancers, ensuring that more patients have the best possible outcome while avoiding dangerous side effects and reducing costs,” said , MD, who moderated today’s presscast. “The third study brings important new insight on increased prevalence of high-risk prostate cancer among elderly men and African Americans.”

Genitourinary cancers include those of the prostate, kidney, bladder and testis, as well as less common cancers such as those of the penis, ureters and other urinary organs. In 2013, more than 388,000 people in the United States are expected to be diagnosed with genitourinary cancers, with more than an estimated 60,000 deaths. The most common genitourinary cancer is prostate cancer, which according to estimates, will be diagnosed in more than 238,000 men in the United States in 2013, and claim more than 29,000 lives. *

The 2013 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium is co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO).


American Society of Clinical Oncology