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Decreased blood levels of a protein called Klotho increase the risk of heart disease in mice with chronic kidney disease

Decreased of a kidney-derived protein called Klotho increases the risk of in with , according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). If the findings are confirmed in humans, Klotho replacement therapy may help protect the heart health of patients with poor kidney function.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in patients with (CKD). Also, cardiac hypertrophy (thickening of the heart muscle) occurs in up to 95% of patients with CKD and increases their risk for cardiovascular death. Through decades of research, investigators have found several risk factors for CKD-associated cardiac hypertrophy, which is also called uremic . Despite correction of all these known factors, however, many patients with CKD still develop uremic .

Chou-Long Huang, MD PhD, Jian Xie, PhD (UT Southwestern Medical Center), and their colleagues designed a study to investigate whether a decrease in levels of circulating soluble Klotho, a protein that is produced by the kidneys and is known to have anti-aging and heart-protective effects, is a missing link to the cause of uremic cardiomyopathy.

The researchers found that levels of soluble Klotho circulating in the blood are reduced in mice with CKD. Also, mice with a genetic deficiency in soluble Klotho develop much more severe uremic cardiomyopathy, and replacing soluble Klotho can protect mice against developing uremic cardiomyopathy.

“Our study shows that a decrease in circulating soluble Klotho in CKD is an important cause of uremic cardiomyopathy and opens new avenues for treatment of the disease,” said Dr. Huang.

Source

Study co-authors include Joonho Yoon, PhD; Sung-Wan An, PhD; and Makoto Kuro-o, MD, PhD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled “Soluble Klotho Protects against Uremic Cardiomyopathy Independently of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Phosphate,” appears online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/.

American Society of Nephrology