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Diversity Outbred mice better predict potential human responses to chemical exposures

A genetically diverse mouse model is able to predict the range of response to that might be observed in human populations, researchers from the have found. Like humans, each Outbred mouse is genetically unique, and the extent of genetic variability among these mice is similar to the genetic variation seen among humans.

This graph shows the change in micronucleus frequencies measured before and after exposure for each Diversity Outbred mouse]
This graph shows the change in micronucleus frequencies measured before and after exposure for each Diversity Outbred mouse.
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The paper is available online in the journal . In addition to NIEHS and NTP, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory, ILS Inc., and Alion Science and Technology Corporation also collaborated in the research effort. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of NIH, also helped support the study (grants P50GM076468 and R01GM070683).

Next spring, the NIEHS Division of Extramural Research and Training plans to hold a meeting to look at the Diversity Outbred mouse model and other population-based rodent models that can be used to advance the field of environmental health sciences.

Reference: French JE, Gatti DM, Morgan DL, Kissling GE, Shockley KR, Knudsen GA, Shepard KG, Price HC, King D, Witt KL, Pedersen LC, Munger SC, Svenson KL, Churchill GA. 2014. Diversity Outbred Mice Identify Population-Based Exposure Thresholds and Genetic Factors that Influence Benzene-Induced Genotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect; doi:10.1289/ehp.1408202.

NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences