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FDA approves first-line use of Vectibix® (panitumumab) plus FOLFOX for patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer

Amgen has announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vectibix® (panitumumab) for use in combination with FOLFOX, an oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimen, as first-line treatment in patients with wild-type KRAS (exon 2) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). With this approval, Vectibix becomes the first and only biologic to offer a significant survival benefit as a first-line treatment with FOLFOX, one of the most commonly used chemotherapy regimens in the first-line setting for patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC. In addition, this approval converts the accelerated monotherapy approval to a full approval for Vectibix. FDA also approved the therascreen® KRAS RGQ PCR Kit developed by QIAGEN (therascreen KRAS test) as a companion diagnostic for Vectibix.

Today’s announcement is the latest milestone in Amgen’s pioneering cancer biomarker research, aimed at helping oncologists personalize cancer treatment to improve patient outcomes. Biomarkers are biological characteristics that demonstrate the likelihood of an individual’s response or lack of response to a particular therapy and are a key element in personalized medicine that can help oncologists choose treatments for patients who are most likely to benefit.

“Because every patient with cancer is unique, we have made it our mission to focus on identifying treatment options for patients based on their cancer’s genetic makeup,” said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. “Approval of Vectibix in combination with FOLFOX for first-line treatment of patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer is an example of the advancements that can be made through a greater understanding of distinct genetic markers associated with difficult-to-treat diseases.”

The approval is based on results from Amgen’s PRIME (’203) and ASPECCT (’763) trials. The PRIME Phase 3 study showed that patients with wild-type KRAS tumors in exon 2 achieved statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with Vectibix and FOLFOX versus FOLFOX alone (9.6 versus 8.0 months, p=0.02) and a significant 4.4 month improvement in overall survival (OS) versus FOLFOX alone (23.8 versus 19.4 months).

The Phase 3 ASPECCT study met its primary endpoint of non-inferiority for improving overall survival in patients taking Vectibix versus Erbitux® (cetuximab) as a single agent for the treatment of mCRC in patients with wild-type KRAS tumors who have not responded to chemotherapy.

“Vectibix is now the first approved biologic to show a significant survival benefit when combined with FOLFOX as a first-line treatment,” said Lee S. Schwartzberg, M.D., medical director of The West Clinic, Memphis, Tenn. “Vectibix has shown a significant benefit to patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer when used with FOLFOX, which gives us a valuable new treatment option as we help patients fight this devastating disease.”

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer found in both men and women in the U.S., and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths.1,2 Approximately 1.2 million cases of colorectal cancer are expected to occur globally.3

About Vectibix® (panitumumab)

Vectibix is the first fully human anti-EGFR antibody approved by the United States (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of mCRC. Vectibix was approved in the U.S. in September 2006 as a monotherapy for the treatment of patients with EGFR-expressing mCRC after disease progression after prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy.

In May 2014, the FDA approved Vectibix for use in combination with FOLFOX, as first-line treatment in patients with wild-type KRAS (exon 2) mCRC. With this approval, Vectibix became the first and only biologic therapy indicated for use with FOLFOX, one of the most commonly used chemotherapy regimens, in the first-line treatment of mCRC for patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC.

Important U.S. Product Information

Vectibix is indicated for the treatment of patients with wild-type KRAS (exon 2 in codons 12 or 13) mCRC as determined by an FDA-approved test for this use:

  • As first-line therapy in combination with FOLFOX
  • As monotherapy following disease progression after prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy

Vectibix is not indicated for the treatment of patients with KRAS-mutant mCRC or for whom KRAS mutation status is unknown.

WARNING: DERMATOLOGIC TOXICITY
Dermatologic Toxicity: Dermatologic toxicities occurred in 90 percent of patients and were severe (NCI-CTC grade 3 or higher) in 15 percent of patients receiving Vectibix monotherapy. [See Dosage and Administration (2.1), Warnings and Precautions (5.1), and Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

Determination of KRAS mutational status in colorectal tumors using an FDA-approved test indicated for this use is necessary for selection of patients for treatment with Vectibix. Patients with KRAS-mutant mCRC tumors receiving Vectibix in combination with FOLFOX experienced shorter OS compared to FOLFOX alone.

Progressively decreasing serum magnesium levels leading to severe (Grade 3-4) hypomagnesemia occurred in up to 7% of patients across clinical trials. Monitor patients for hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia prior to initiating Vectibix treatment, periodically during Vectibix treatment, and for up to 8 weeks after the completion of treatment.

In a clinical trial, 4% of patients experienced infusion reactions and 1% of patients experienced severe infusion reactions (NCI-CTC grade 3-4).

Severe diarrhea and dehydration, leading to acute renal failure and other complications, have been observed in patients treated with Vectibix in combination with chemotherapy.

Fatal and non-fatal cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (1%) and pulmonary fibrosis have been observed in patients treated with Vectibix. Pulmonary fibrosis occurred in less than 1% (2/1467) of patients enrolled in clinical studies of Vectibix. In the event of acute onset or worsening of pulmonary symptoms, interrupt Vectibix therapy. Discontinue Vectibix therapy if ILD is confirmed.

The most common adverse reactions of Vectibix are skin rash with variable presentations, paronychia, fatigue, nausea and diarrhea. The most frequently reported serious, adverse reactions of Vectibix are general physical health deterioration, and intestinal obstruction.

The most commonly reported adverse reactions (? 20%) in patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC receiving Vectibix (6 mg/kg every 2 weeks) and FOLFOX therapy (N = 322) in Study 3 were diarrhea, stomatitis, mucosal inflammation, asthenia, paronychia, anorexia, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, rash, acneiform dermatitis, pruritus, and dry skin. Serious adverse reactions (? 2% difference between treatment arms) in Vectibix-treated patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC were diarrhea and dehydration.

To see the full Vectibix Safety Information, visit www.vectibix.com.

Source

1 Colorectal Cancer Facts and Figures. American Cancer Society website. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-key-statistics. Accessed March 25, 2013.

2 Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®). National Cancer Institute. Accessed March 25, 2013. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/prevention/colorectal/HealthProfessional/page3.

3Jemal. Global Cancer Statistics. CA Cancer J Clin. 2011;61:69-90.

Amgen