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How to prevent 10 million deaths a year

Strategic investments to discover and develop new health tools, together with innovations in effectively delivering today’s health tools and services, could avert 10 million deaths a year within just one generation, argue leading global health experts in a new PLOS Collection. The unique collection of papers involves 69 authors from high-, middle- and low-income countries, and includes some of the world’s leading disease control experts.

“Grand Convergence: Aligning Technologies and Realities in Global Health” builds on the Lancet report “Global Health 2035″ which argued that it is possible, through a strategic investment plan, to achieve a “grand convergence” in health that would reduce avertable infectious, maternal, and child deaths down to universally low levels within a generation by aggressively scaling up health tools. But the report came to an important conclusion: the world cannot reach convergence with today’s tools alone; tomorrow’s tools will also be needed.

The collection, led by Gavin Yamey, Professor of the Practice of Global Health and Public Policy at the Duke Global Health Institute, who led the writing of Global Health 2035 , and Carlos Morel, Director of the Center for Technological Development in Health and a Senior Researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) in Brazil, focuses on five conditions that disproportionately affect the world’s poorest people: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, maternal and child mortality, and neglected tropical diseases. The articles, published across PLOS Biology, PLOS Medicine and PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and written by experts directing global disease control campaigns or international research efforts, explore the diverse array of innovations that will be needed to prevent and treat diseases, and to successfully ramp-up the delivery of health tools and services to those most in need.

The prospect of achieving a grand convergence in global health within a generation can only be realized through a serious, renewed effort to step up investments in R&D to tackle the health conditions of poverty, argue Yamey and Morel. This collection aims to inspire the international health community to contribute to an “unprecedented opportunity to boost human development worldwide.”

“We have a once in human history opportunity to save 10 million lives a year,” said Professor Yamey, “but we can only achieve this extraordinary transformation in global health by massively stepping up our efforts to discover and deliver new health technologies.”