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In Pancreatic Cancer Model Nerve Growth Factors Elevated

Severe pain is a major symptom of . The results of a new study show that four different factors involved in the growth and maintenance of nerves are elevated in a of . This is a step forward in understanding the relationship between the development of pain and the progression of .

“When other researchers have looked at samples of pancreatic cancer, they have described perineural tumor invasion in as many as 90 to 100 percent of cases,” said , a M.D./Ph.D. student at the University of Pittsburgh in Pa. “We used a mouse model of pancreatic cancer to look at what drives these interactions, and to investigate what role tumor-nerve interactions play in cancer progression.”

She presented these findings at the American Association for Cancer Research’s Pancreatic Cancer: Progress and Challenges conference, being held here June 18-21.

Stopczynski and colleagues measured the levels of , which are proteins in charge of the growth and maintenance of , in the pancreata of mice with a condition modeling pancreatic cancer and healthy controls aged between 16 and 30 weeks. They also measured the density and distribution of nerve fibers in the pancreas and observed levels of physical activity.

Expression levels of four neurotrophic factors were higher in the pancreata of mice with pancreatic cancer. Nerve bundles were also observed to be larger and the overall physical activity undertaken by the mice with pancreatic cancer was reduced.

This adds important information to our understanding of pancreatic cancer, especially since not all cancers invade as pancreatic tumor cells do, and not all cancers cause the same level of visceral pain, according to Stopczynski.

“A tumor invading a nerve is going to damage that nerve, causing pain. The nerve can also shield the tumor cells from chemotherapeutic drugs, while at the same time serving as a pathway for tumor cells to spread to other organs. Therefore, these interactions could be responsible for different aspects of cancer progression as well as the development of pain,” she said.

Source

This research is funded by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the Shirley Hobbs Martin Memorial Fund.

American Association for Cancer Research