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Infants Express Non-Verbal Sympathy For Others In Distress

Infants as young as ten months express sympathy for others in distress in non-verbal ways, according to research published June 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by and colleagues from and , Japan.

Infants at this age are known to assign goals and intentions to geometric figures; hence the researchers used a series of animated sequences to test infants’ responses to aggression. In their experiments, researchers showed infants an aggressive ‘social interaction’ between a blue ball that attacked and violently crushed a yellow cube and found that the babies preferentially reached for the victim rather than the aggressor. Infants’ behavior remained consistent when the roles of the shapes were reversed and when a neutral, non-aggressive shape was introduced in the video, suggesting that their preference for the victim was not out of fear of the aggressive shape. Based on these observations, the authors conclude, “Ten-month olds not only evaluate the roles of victims and aggressors in interactions but also show rudimentary sympathy toward others in distress based on that evaluation. This simple preference may function as a foundation for full-fledged sympathetic behavior later on.”

Source

Citation: Kanakogi Y, Okumura Y, Inoue Y, Kitazaki M, Itakura S (2013) Rudimentary Sympathy in Preverbal Infants: Preference for Others in Distress. PLoS ONE 8(6): e65292. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065292

Financial Disclosure: This work was supported by a grant to Yasuhiro Kanakogi from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists and grants to from JSPS (21220005, 20220002 and 20220004), MEXT (21118005) and the Nissan Science Foundation. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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