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New details revealed in the coordinated regulation of large stretches of DNA

For a skin cell to do its job, it must turn on a completely different set of genes than a liver cell — and keep genes it doesn’t need switched off. One way of turning off large groups of genes at once is to send them to “time-out” at the edge of the nucleus, where they are kept quiet. New research from sheds light on how DNA gets sent to the nucleus’ far edge, a process critical to controlling genes and determining cell fate.

DNA is Taken to the Nuclear Lamina by YY1
In mouse cells, the YY1 protein binds to a segment of DNA (green), leading it to attach to the lamina (red) at the edge of the nucleus.
Credit:Reddy Lab,


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Other authors of the report include , , Xianrong Wong, Erez Cohen and Sarah Wheelan of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (1 R01 GM106024-01).

Johns Hopkins Medicine