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New Findings Offer Systemic Solutions To Address Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) In Low- And Middle-income Countries

The Johns Hopkins University report identifies systemic gaps in NCD research, policy and practice

. This week the Johns Hopkins University’s Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health and the Study of Business Enterprise released a focused set of policy briefs that provide actionable recommendations for improving NCD policy, research and, ultimately, care. The study was commissioned by the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations (IFPMA).

The four main NCD categories – cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung diseases and diabetes – kill three in five people worldwide. Nearly 80% of NCD deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

As part of momentum from the 2011 United Nations High Level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of NCDs, a working group of leading scholars Addressing the Gaps in Global Policy and Research for Non-Communicable Diseases . Their findings provide decision-makers with five key areas for action: 1) strengthening supply chains, 2) accelerating regulatory convergence, 3) applying HIV/AIDS learnings to improve access to interventions, 4) restructuring primary care, and 5) promoting multisectoral action. 1produced this collection of briefs:

“We harnessed the direction given by UN Member States in the NCD Political Declaration as a springboard for action,” said Sir George Alleyne, former director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), and co-author of one of the briefs. “Based on this direction, our work paves a way forward to achieve better health outcomes through multisectoral and intersectoral cooperation.”

Eduardo Pisani, IFPMA Director General, said, “The research-based pharmaceutical industry commissioned these briefs to generate ideas which we hope will contribute to WHO discussions and provide a path forward where our industry is best prepared to play its part with other stakeholders”.

The Johns Hopkins policy briefs can be accessed here.


Source: Jon Hopkins University