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Prostate cancer study: Quanterix’s Simoa technology demonstrates ability to analyze single cancer cells

Quanterix Corporation, a leader in the transformation of healthcare through its ultrasensitive single molecule testing capabilities, has announced that Analytical Chemistry, a leading peer-reviewed scientific journal, has published a groundbreaking new study authored by Dr. David Walt of Tufts University that prominently features Quanterix’s Single Molecule Array Detection technology, Simoa. The publication demonstrates that the ultrasensitive technology makes it possible to quantify phenotypic responses of individual prostate cancer cells, a technique that could be useful for understanding fundamental biology and may eventually enable both earlier disease detection and targeted therapy.

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately one in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime and about one in 38 men will die from the disease. As such, it’s critical to quickly and accurately detect elevated PSA levels at much earlier stages in disease development to allow for an improved prognosis. Simoa’s newly uncovered ability to track protein expression in single cells does just that by enabling the study of cellular pathways and behaviors with greater precision than ever before, and could enable both earlier disease detection and targeted therapy in oncology.

“The potential to detect proteins at the single cell level is a major breakthrough in oncology research, where the ability to perform ultrasensitive liquid tumor biopsies rather than more invasive traditional approaches can dramatically impact early detection of cancers,” said Kevin Hrusovsky, CEO and Executive Chairman, Quanterix. “This level of detection has the capacity to fuel a major groundswell of research in the oncology space. We look forward to continued innovations and new discoveries in this therapeutic area as we aim to revolutionize the way in which cancer is being detected and treated today in hopes of eventually redefining remission.”