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Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s unique sense of ‘touch’ enables it to infect anything

New research has found that one of the world’s most prolific manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism — a . This unique ability helps make the ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment.

[Ameoba]
A study led by researchers found that one of the world’s most prolific bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism — a sense of touch. This technique means the bacteria, unlike most pathogens, do not rely on a chemical signal specific to any one host. To demonstrate the bacteria’s versatility, the researchers infected ivy cells (blue rings) with the bacteria (green areas) then introduced amoebas (yellow) to the same sample. Pseudomonas immediately detected and quickly overwhelmed the amoebas.
Credit: Image by Albert Siryaporn, Department of Molecular Biology


Source

The paper, “Surface attachment induces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence,” was published online Nov. 10 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The work was supported by a National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award (grant no. 1DP2OD004389); the National Science Foundation (grant no. 1330288); an NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases postdoctoral fellowship (no. F32AI095002) and grant (no. R37-AI83256-06); and the Human Frontiers in Science Program.

Princeton University