3 days popular7 days popular1 month popular3 months popular

Seeing the knee in a new light: Fluorescent probe tracks osteoarthritis development

Study findings may lead to improved method to detect early to moderate

A may make it easier to diagnose and monitor osteoarthritis, a painful joint disease affecting nearly 27 million Americans. The disease is often detected late in development after painful symptoms occur. Earlier diagnosis might lead to better management and patient outcomes. A new study reports that a tracked the development of osteoarthritis in male mice, brightening as the disease progressed. The findings are published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

X-ray Image of Asteoarthritic Knees
This is an X-ray image of osteoarthritic knees.

Credit:National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

Source

Additional authors of this study are Carrie K. Hui, B.S., a doctoral student in the cellular, molecular and developmental biology program at the ; Roshni S. Rainbow, Ph.D., an affiliate in the department of anatomy and basic sciences at Tufts University School of Medicine and former and Academic Career Development (IRACDA) postdoctoral fellow at the Sackler School; Daisy S. Nakamura, B.S., a doctoral student in the cellular, molecular and developmental biology program at the Sackler School; and Brian H. Tracey, Ph.D., professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at Tufts University School of Engineering. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award numbers F30AR065866 and R01AR059106, by a research training grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the NIH under award number K12GM074869 (IRACDA), and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH under award number UL1TR001064. Additional funding was provided by a Tufts Collaborates seed grant, and the National Science Foundation under award number CBET-0966920.

The Institutional Research Career and Academic Development Awards from the NIGMS combine traditional post-doctoral research work with mentored teaching experience at institutions that serve under-represented minorities. The Sackler School’s IRACDA Training in Education and Critical Research Skills (TEACRS) program is a partnership with the University of Massachusetts, Boston; Pine Manor College, and Bunker Hill Community College. It is the only IRACDA-funded program in New England.

Leahy, A. A., Esfahani, S. A., Foote, A. T., Hui, C. K., Rainbow, R. S., Nakamura, D. S., Tracey, B. H., Mahmood, U., & Zeng, L. (February 2015). “Analysis of the Trajectory of Osteoarthritis Development in a Mouse Model by Serial Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activities.” Arthritis & Rheumatology, 67(2). DOI: 10.1002/art.38957

Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus