3 days popular7 days popular1 month popular3 months popular

Study Finds Extremes In Spiteful Behavior

Given the option to commit acts, reducing the money payoffs of others at no cost to themselves, many people avoid acting spitefully, but those that do, consistently impose the maximum harm, according to research reported in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

The authors, of in Canada and Philipp Reiss of in the Netherlands, created an artificial auction market scenario, with participants “bidding” for objects and having the opportunity to raise the price paid by others, to test the frequency and extent of spiteful behavior among 48 . Their results show extremes of spiteful and non-spiteful behavior across all participants, but individual spitefulness is typically consistent over time.

“We found it astonishing to see that people chose to be either maximally or minimally spiteful with really no one choosing something in between, and the fact that most people didn’t change their behavior over time suggests that we’re seeing something pretty fundamental”, say the authors.

Source

Citation: Kimbrough EO, Reiss JP (2012) Measuring the Distribution of Spitefulness. PLoS ONE 7(8): e41812. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041812
Financial Disclosure: This research was funded by grants from Maastricht University’s METEOR research program in , Theory and Computing. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0041812
Public Library of Science