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Toxic punch of experimental anti-cancer drug eliminated by ‘sugar-coated’ microcapsule

researchers have developed a sugar-based molecular microcapsule that eliminates the toxicity of an anticancer agent developed a decade ago at , called 3-bromopyruvate, or 3BrPA, in studies of mice with implants of human tissue. The encapsulated drug packed a potent anticancer punch, stopping the progression of tumors in the mice, but without the usual toxic effects.

[3BrPA (red)]
3BrPA (red) is illustrated encased in a sugar-based microshell.

Credit: , Johns Hopkins

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Other Johns Hopkins researchers who contributed to the study include Julius Chapiro, Surojit Sur, , Shanmugasundaram Ganapathy-Kaniappan, Juvenal Reyes, Rafael Duran, Sivarajan Chettiar-Thiruganasambandam, , MingDe Lin, Weibo Luo, Phuoc T. Tran, Joseph M. Herman, Gregg L. Semenza, Andrew J. Ewald and Bert Vogelstein.

The study was funded by the ’s National Cancer Institute grants (R01 CA160771, P30 CA006973, NCRR UL1 RR 025005 and DOD CDMRP, W81XWH-11-1-0343, K99-CA168746, R01CA166348), the Rolf W. Gunther Foundation for Radiological Science, the American Cancer Society (RSG-12-141-01-CSM), the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research, and the Lustgarten Foundation.

Geschwind has served as a consultant for BTG, Bayer HealthCare, Guerbet, Philips Healthcare and Boston-Scientific. He has received grant support from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Society of Interventional Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, BTG, Bayer HealthCare, Philips Healthcare, Threshold and Guerbet. He is the CEO and founder of PreScience Labs, which has licensed 3BrPA from Johns Hopkins.

Systemic Delivery of Microencapsulated 3-Bromopyruvate for the Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

Published OnlineFirst in Clinical Cancer Research October 17, 2014; doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-1271

Johns Hopkins Medicine